Heathenry is sometimes called “the religion with homework.” There is a process of enculturation that must take place when a person returns to their Folkway. To return to the world-view and way-of-life of our Ancestors, one must read and study, and begin putting what they learning into practice. The problem of course, is making sure that you are accessing the right resources. Much of the information about Heathenry you find on the internet or in books is misleading or just wrong.

Most Heathens will recommend going to your primary sources first.These consist of the Poetic Edda, the Prose Edda, the Icelandic Sagas, Beowulf, and other contemporary source material. Then there are well-researched secondary sources that can be valuable in fleshing out your understanding. Beyond that, there are tertiary sources, such as story-books retelling the stories in the Lore, books of modern Heathen poetry, etc. Below is a list of books worth reading.

Some of the following books can be read and downloaded for free from the Temple Library here on our website.  Some are available as paperbacks, hardcovers, and free downloads in the Heathen Bookstore of our website. Where possible, we've provided links to where you can find the books for free.  Many of the others can be ordered on-line or at your local bookstore. Over time, we'll be adding more of these titles available for purchase or free download.  There are a few books on this list that are a real challenge to find, but well worth the search.  If there is a book here you've looked and looked for, but can't find, email me at voidpulp@gmail.com and I'll try to point you in the right direction.


The Poetic Edda – This is available in various translations. Larrington's is the easiest to understand, but one of the least poetic. Hollander's is one of the most poetic, but sometime difficult to understand. Bellow's translation is a pretty fair balance of clarity and a poetic sense. Larrington and Hollander's translations come in one volume, while Bellow's translation is split into two volumes.

The Prose Edda by Snorri Sturluson – This is also available in various translations. The Byock, Faulkes, and Young translations are all fairly good.

Essential Asatru by Diana Paxon

Heathen Gods by Mark Ludwig Stinson

Heathen Tribes by Mark Ludwig Stinson

Our Troth: History and Lore (Volume 1) by Kveldulf Gundarsson

Our Troth: Living the Troth (Volume 2) by Kveldulf Gundarsson

Elves, Wights, and Trolls by Kveldulf Gundarsson

Beowulf trans. by Seamus Heaney (I strongly suggested this trans.)

The Sagas of Icelanders (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)

The Saga Hoard, Volumes 1-2 (Temple Library Collection)

Egil's Saga and Njal's Saga

The Saga of the Volsungs translated by Jesse Byock

The Sagas of Ragnar Lodbrok translated by Ben Waggoner

The Sagas of Fridthjof the Bold translated by Ben Waggoner

The Nibelungenlied

The Agricola and Germania by Tacitus (available in various trans.)

Heimskringla by Snorri Sturluson (available in various trans.)

The History of the Danes, Books I-IX by Saxo Grammaticus

Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation by the Venerable Bede

The Culture of the Teutons (Volumes 1 and 2) by Vilhelm Grönbech - Collected into one book available in our website's Heathen Bookstore.

Gods and Myths of the Viking Age by H.R. Ellis Davidson

The Road to Hel by H.R. Ellis Davidson

Myths and Symbols in Pagan Europe by H.R. Ellis Davidson

The Well and the Tree by Paul C. Bauschatz (hard to find)

The Mead Hall by Stephen Pollington (hard to find)

The Norse Myths: Gods of the Vikings by Kevin Crossley-Holland

The Children of Odin by by Padraic Colum

D'Aulaire's Book of Norse Myths by Ingri and Edgar D'Aulaire

True Hearth by James Allen Chisholm

Way of the Heathen by Garman Lord

AFA Book of Blotar and Ritual

The Book of Troth by Edred Thorsson

The Rune Primer by Sweyn Plowright

On Being a Pagan by Alain de Benoist

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